Post-measles clinical courses in hypogammaglobulinemic subjects ...

Post-measles clinical courses in hypogammaglobulinemic subjects ...

🇮🇹❌This study published on "Clinical and Vaccine Immunology"in 2006, contributes to calling into question what was previously observed in subjects suffering from agammaglobulinemia (see post published on "The Lancet" in 1968) once the measles virus is contracted, they do not develop antibodies, yet they overcome the disease.

In short, it casts a very heavy shadow on all the pseudo-scientific theories that junk science has produced (starting from flock immunity and ending up with the alleged antibody coverages) ...

«Immune Containment and Consequences of Measles Virus Infection in Healthy and Immunocompromised Individuals» https://cvi.asm.org/content/13/4/437

It is unclear, however, whether antibodies play a role in MV clearance (Measles-virus) after the start of an infection. In 1956, Good and Zak described the clinical outcome of MV infection in children with congenital or acquired immune defects.

measles

In their report on these "experiments of nature", children with cellular immune defects developed a particularly severe clinical syndrome, while children with hypogammaglobulinemia had a typical clinical course (37).

These observations suggested a primary role for cell-mediated rather than humoral immunity in recovery from MV infections.

Recent studies with non-human primates have directed the contribution of humoral immunity to the removal of MV infection.

Rhesus monkeys were depleted of B lymphocytes by infusion of monoclonal antibodies and infected with MV. These B cell-depleted animals had a virological and clinical outcome indistinguishable from that of healthy monkeys.

Basically, what he's saying is that monkeys were depleted of their ability to make antibodies (their cellular immunity has been left intact) and got infected with measles. Antibody-depleted monkeys recovered indistinguishable as did monkeys who had a perfectly functioning immune system.

🇬🇧❌ "Immune Containment and Consequences of Measles Virus Infection in Healthy and Immunocompromised Individuals ". https://cvi.asm.org/content/13/4/437 It is unclear, however, whether antibodies have a role in MV clearance after an infection is initiated. In 1956, Good and Zak described the clinical outcome of MV infection in children with congenital or acquired immune defects. In their report of these "experiments of nature," children with cellular immune defects developed a particularly severe clinical syndrome, whereas children with hypogammaglobulinemia had a typical clinical course (37). These observations suggested a primary role for cell-mediated rather than humoral immunity in recovery from MV infections. Recent studies with nonhuman primates have addressed the contribution of humoral immunity to the clearance of MV infection. Rhesus monkeys were depleted of B lymphocytes by monoclonal antibody infusion and infected with MV. These B-cell-depleted animals had a virologic and clinical outcome that was indistinguishable from that of healthy monkeys. Basically, what this is saying is that the monkeys were depleted of their ability to produce antibodies (their cellular immunity was left intact), and were infected with measles. The monkeys depleted of antibodies recovered indistinguishably as well as monkeys who had a full functioning immune system. CLINICAL AND VACCINE IMMUNOLOGY, Apr. 2006, p. 437-443Vol. 13, No. 41556-6811 / 06 / $ 08.000 doi: 10.1128 / CVI.13.4.437–443.2006